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A World History of Rubber

A World History of Rubber

Author: Stephen L. Harp
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118934253
Pages: 184
Year: 2015-09-28
A World History of Rubber helps readers understand and gain new insights into the social and cultural contexts of global production and consumption, from the nineteenth century to today, through the fascinating story of one commodity. Divides the coverage into themes of race, migration, and labor; gender on plantations and in factories; demand and everyday consumption; World Wars and nationalism; and resistance and independence Highlights the interrelatedness of our world long before the age of globalization and the global social inequalities that persist today Discusses key concepts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including imperialism, industrialization, racism, and inequality, through the lens of rubber Provides an engaging and accessible narrative for all levels that is filled with archival research, illustrations, and maps
A World History of Rubber

A World History of Rubber

Author: Stephen L. Harp
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118934229
Pages: 190
Year: 2015-12-29
A World History of Rubber helps readers understand and gain new insights into the social and cultural contexts of global production and consumption, from the nineteenth century to today, through the fascinating story of one commodity. Divides the coverage into themes of race, migration, and labor; gender on plantations and in factories; demand and everyday consumption; World Wars and nationalism; and resistance and independence Highlights the interrelatedness of our world long before the age of globalization and the global social inequalities that persist today Discusses key concepts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including imperialism, industrialization, racism, and inequality, through the lens of rubber Provides an engaging and accessible narrative for all levels that is filled with archival research, illustrations, and maps
A World History of Rubber

A World History of Rubber

Author: Stephen L. Harp
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118934237
Pages: 175
Year: 2015-12-29
A World History of Rubber helps readers understand and gain new insights into the social and cultural contexts of global production and consumption, from the nineteenth century to today, through the fascinating story of one commodity. Divides the coverage into themes of race, migration, and labor; gender on plantations and in factories; demand and everyday consumption; World Wars and nationalism; and resistance and independence Highlights the interrelatedness of our world long before the age of globalization and the global social inequalities that persist today Discusses key concepts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including imperialism, industrialization, racism, and inequality, through the lens of rubber Provides an engaging and accessible narrative for all levels that is filled with archival research, illustrations, and maps
The Devil’s Milk

The Devil’s Milk

Author: John Tully
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1583672613
Pages: 416
Year: 2011-02-01
Capital, as Marx once wrote, comes into the world “dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt.” He might well have been describing the long, grim history of rubber. From the early stages of primitive accumulation to the heights of the industrial revolution and beyond, rubber is one of a handful of commodities that has played a crucial role in shaping the modern world, and yet, as John Tully shows in this remarkable book, laboring people around the globe have every reason to regard it as “the devil’s milk.” All the advancements made possible by rubber—industrial machinery, telegraph technology, medical equipment, countless consumer goods—have occurred against a backdrop of seemingly endless exploitation, conquest, slavery, and war. But Tully is quick to remind us that the vast terrain of rubber production has always been a site of struggle, and that the oppressed who toil closest to “the devil’s milk” in all its forms have never accepted their immiseration without a fight. This book, the product of exhaustive scholarship carried out in many countries and several continents, is destined to become a classic.Tully tells the story of humanity’s long encounter with rubber in a kaleidoscopic narrative that regards little as outside its rangewithout losing sight of the commodity in question. With the skill of a master historian and the elegance of a novelist, he presents what amounts to a history of the modern world told through the multiple lives of rubber.
Ecology and Power in the Age of Empire

Ecology and Power in the Age of Empire

Author: Corey Ross
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191091979
Pages: 512
Year: 2017-04-06
Ecology and Power in the Age of Empire provides the first wide-ranging environmental history of the heyday of European imperialism, from the late nineteenth century to the end of the colonial era. It focuses on the ecological dimensions of the explosive growth of tropical commodity production, global trade, and modern resource management-transformations that still visibly shape our world today-and how they were related to broader social, cultural, and political developments in Europe's colonies. Covering the overseas empires of all the major European powers, Corey Ross argues that tropical environments were not merely a stage on which conquest and subjugation took place, but were an essential part of the colonial project, profoundly shaping the imperial enterprise even as they were shaped by it. The story he tells is not only about the complexities of human experience, but also about people's relationship with the ecosystems in which they were themselves embedded: the soil, water, plants, and animals that were likewise a part of Europe's empire. Although it shows that imperial conquest rarely represented a sudden bout of ecological devastation, it nonetheless demonstrates that modern imperialism marked a decisive and largely negative milestone for the natural environment. By relating the expansion of modern empire, global trade, and mass consumption to the momentous ecological shifts that they entailed, this book provides a historical perspective on the vital nexus of social, political, and environmental issues that we face in the twenty-first-century world.
Rubber

Rubber

Author: Quentin R. Skrabec, Jr.
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 147661217X
Pages: 244
Year: 2013-12-27
The rubber industry was born in bankruptcy and built through bankruptcies. As this history details, many of the great rubber barons--Charles Goodyear, Harvey Firestone, B.F. Goodrich, F.A. Seiberling--found themselves or their companies in bankruptcy courts. Fortunately, the industry has always proven as elastic as its product. From the early search for an American location to process the rubber of the tropics to the collapse of the industry, this is the story of rubber in America.
The Thief at the End of the World

The Thief at the End of the World

Author: Joe Jackson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0670018538
Pages: 414
Year: 2008
JACKSON/THIEF AT THE END OF THE WOR
Sugar and Civilization

Sugar and Civilization

Author: April Merleaux
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469622521
Pages: 320
Year: 2015-07-13
In the weeks and months after the end of the Spanish-American War, Americans celebrated their nation's triumph by eating sugar. Each of the nation's new imperial possessions, from Puerto Rico to the Philippines, had the potential for vastly expanding sugar production. As victory parties and commemorations prominently featured candy and other sweets, Americans saw sugar as the reward for their global ambitions. April Merleaux demonstrates that trade policies and consumer cultures are as crucial to understanding U.S. empire as military or diplomatic interventions. As the nation's sweet tooth grew, people debated tariffs, immigration, and empire, all of which hastened the nation's rise as an international power. These dynamics played out in the bureaucracies of Washington, D.C., in the pages of local newspapers, and at local candy counters. Merleaux argues that ideas about race and civilization shaped sugar markets since government policies and business practices hinged on the racial characteristics of the people who worked the land and consumed its products. Connecting the history of sugar to its producers, consumers, and policy makers, Merleaux shows that the modern American sugar habit took shape in the shadow of a growing empire.
Fordlandia

Fordlandia

Author: Greg Grandin
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 1429938013
Pages: 432
Year: 2010-04-27
The stunning, never before told story of the quixotic attempt to recreate small-town America in the heart of the Amazon In 1927, Henry Ford, the richest man in the world, bought a tract of land twice the size of Delaware in the Brazilian Amazon. His intention was to grow rubber, but the project rapidly evolved into a more ambitious bid to export America itself, along with its golf courses, ice-cream shops, bandstands, indoor plumbing, and Model Ts rolling down broad streets. Fordlandia, as the settlement was called, quickly became the site of an epic clash. On one side was the car magnate, lean, austere, the man who reduced industrial production to its simplest motions; on the other, the Amazon, lush, extravagant, the most complex ecological system on the planet. Ford's early success in imposing time clocks and square dances on the jungle soon collapsed, as indigenous workers, rejecting his midwestern Puritanism, turned the place into a ribald tropical boomtown. Fordlandia's eventual demise as a rubber plantation foreshadowed the practices that today are laying waste to the rain forest. More than a parable of one man's arrogant attempt to force his will on the natural world, Fordlandia depicts a desperate quest to salvage the bygone America that the Ford factory system did much to dispatch. As Greg Grandin shows in this gripping and mordantly observed history, Ford's great delusion was not that the Amazon could be tamed but that the forces of capitalism, once released, might yet be contained. Fordlandia is a 2009 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.
Michelin Men

Michelin Men

Author: Herbert R. Lottman
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857714716
Pages: 288
Year: 2003-10-24
Do come, all is not lost if you come. It’s for you to save what our fathers passed down to us.’ Thus, legend has it, wrote Emilie Barbier to her nephew, Edouard Michelin. The year was 1886; the occasion, a meeting to discuss the future of the failing family firm. _x000D_ _x000D_ Edouard did come and was appointed managing director. He would need half a million francs, he told his aunt, and she put the money at his disposal - but not before ensuring a room would be hers at a convent should the investment fail!_x000D_ _x000D_ The Michelin Men tells the remarkable story of how two brothers Edouard and André Michelin turned a troubled family firm in the heart of rural France into one of the most successful business empires in the world. _x000D_ _x000D_ Edouard, a landscape painter at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, displayed a genius for engineering and product innovation, whilst André, trained as an engineer, revealed an artistic genius for advertising and marketing. ‘Here is the champagne. I am the bubbles’, said André Michelin introducing brother Edouard. Together they kick-started the world automobile industry and gave us one of the most famous and best loved company logos - Bibendum, the 'Michelin Man'. _x000D_ _x000D_ In their determination to conquer the British market they gave London one of its best loved buildings - Michelin House. Opened by André Michelin in 1911, the building was a clear statement of their ambitions to outdo their long-term rivals, Dunlop. Meanwhile, in America, the brothers passionate advocates of the latest US management and production techniques - declared their global ambitions with a Michelin facility at Milltown, New Jersey._x000D_ _x000D_ In their search for new ways to publicise and market their products, they created a tourist industry around the motor car and their now legendary Michelin Guides. It was the Michelin Guide that US officers carried with them in their kit when they landed on the Normandy beaches in June 1944 - complete with its listings of the best food, good wines and peaceful hotels. And today the Michelin Guides are more influential than ever, setting standards for the culinary world that can make or break chefs as they strive to keep their rating or acquire the coveted third star._x000D_ _x000D_ With its larger-than-life characters and compelling story, The Michelin Men is an exciting tale of one of France's great companies and two of her more remarkable sons.
Transformation of the World

Transformation of the World

Author:
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 134906307X
Pages: 174
Year: 2015-12-30

Environment and Empire

Environment and Empire

Author: William Beinart, Lotte Hughes
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0199260311
Pages: 395
Year: 2007-10-11
This volume uncovers the interaction between people and the elements in very different British colonies throughout the world. Providing a rich overview of socio-environmental change, driven by imperial forces, this study examines a key global historical process.
Red Rubber, Bleeding Trees

Red Rubber, Bleeding Trees

Author: Michael Edward Stanfield
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 270
Year: 1998-01
This vivid ethno-history explores the complex transformation of north-western Amazonia by the rubber boom from 1850 to 1933. During this period, the region underwent rapid and violent incorporation into the political and economic systems of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Brazil, Western Europe, and the United States. The author examines the historical myths and realities of north-west Amazonia before its incorporation and then shows how the Indians and environment were radically altered by the rubber boom and international trade. Not merely victims, the Indians both aided and resisted economic and environmental change in subtle and contradictory ways. In 1907 allegations of the systematic enslavement, torture, and murder of Indians by the rubber industry ignited an international scandal linking antislavery power Great Britain to human bondage and focused world attention on Amazonia until the outbreak of World War I.
An Empire of Plants

An Empire of Plants

Author: Toby Musgrave, Will Musgrave
Publisher: Cassell
ISBN: 1844030202
Pages: 192
Year: 2002
For centuries, from foodstuffs to industrial materials, plants have dominated trade between countries. Possession of rare spices, sweets, and narcotics could meand enviable wealth and power, so explorers ventured forth, risking death on unknown seas. Here are stories of seven plants--tobacco, sugar, cotton, tea, poppies, quinine, and rubber--and how Europe's hunger for them led to the Age of Empire and turned world history upside down. Not only did these crops ensure the commercial success of America and Europe, but they became the catalyst foasr piracy, smuggling, addiction, and the slave trade: the darker side of the golden profits. A beautiful presentation of a fascinating subject.
One River

One River

Author: Wade Davis
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439126836
Pages: 544
Year: 2010-05-11
The story of two generations of scientific explorers in South America—Richard Evans Schultes and his protégé Wade Davis—an epic tale of adventure and a compelling work of natural history. In 1941, Professor Richard Evan Schultes took a leave from Harvard and disappeared into the Amazon, where he spent the next twelve years mapping uncharted rivers and living among dozens of Indian tribes. In the 1970s, he sent two prize students, Tim Plowman and Wade Davis, to follow in his footsteps and unveil the botanical secrets of coca, the notorious source of cocaine, a sacred plant known to the Inca as the Divine Leaf of Immortality. A stunning account of adventure and discovery, betrayal and destruction, One River is a story of two generations of explorers drawn together by the transcendent knowledge of Indian peoples, the visionary realms of the shaman, and the extraordinary plants that sustain all life in a forest that once stood immense and inviolable.