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Homegoing

Homegoing

Author: Yaa Gyasi
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1101947144
Pages: 320
Year: 2016-06-07
Winner of the NBCC's John Leonard First Book Prize A New York Times 2016 Notable Book One of Oprah’s 10 Favorite Books of 2016 NPR's Debut Novel of the Year One of Buzzfeed's Best Fiction Books Of 2016 One of Time's Top 10 Novels of 2016 “Homegoing is an inspiration.” —Ta-Nehisi Coates The unforgettable New York Times best seller begins with the story of two half-sisters, separated by forces beyond their control: one sold into slavery, the other married to a British slaver. Written with tremendous sweep and power, Homegoing traces the generations of family who follow, as their destinies lead them through two continents and three hundred years of history, each life indeliably drawn, as the legacy of slavery is fully revealed in light of the present day. Effia and Esi are born into different villages in eighteenth-century Ghana. Effia is married off to an Englishman and lives in comfort in the palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle. Unbeknownst to Effia, her sister, Esi, is imprisoned beneath her in the castle’s dungeons, sold with thousands of others into the Gold Coast’s booming slave trade, and shipped off to America, where her children and grandchildren will be raised in slavery. One thread of Homegoing follows Effia’s descendants through centuries of warfare in Ghana, as the Fante and Asante nations wrestle with the slave trade and British colonization. The other thread follows Esi and her children into America. From the plantations of the South to the Civil War and the Great Migration, from the coal mines of Pratt City, Alabama, to the jazz clubs and dope houses of twentieth-century Harlem, right up through the present day, Homegoing makes history visceral, and captures, with singular and stunning immediacy, how the memory of captivity came to be inscribed in the soul of a nation.
Homegoing

Homegoing

Author: Yaa Gyasi
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0241975247
Pages: 320
Year: 2016-06-07
THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER Selected for Granta's Best of Young American Novelists 2017 Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best First Book Shortlisted for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction Effia and Esi: two sisters with two very different destinies. One sold into slavery; one a slave trader's wife. The consequences of their fate reverberate through the generations that follow. Taking us from the Gold Coast of Africa to the cotton-picking plantations of Mississippi; from the missionary schools of Ghana to the dive bars of Harlem, spanning three continents and seven generations, Yaa Gyasi has written a miraculous novel - the intimate, gripping story of a brilliantly vivid cast of characters and through their lives the very story of America itself. Epic in its canvas and intimate in its portraits, Homegoing is a searing and profound debut from a masterly new writer.
Homegoing

Homegoing

Author: Yaa Gyasi
Publisher: Bond Street Books
ISBN: 0385686145
Pages: 304
Year: 2016-06-07
"Homegoing is an inspiration." —Ta-Nehisi Coates An unforgettable New York Times bestseller of exceptional scope and sweeping vision that traces the descendants of two sisters across three hundred years in Ghana and America. A riveting kaleidoscopic debut novel and the beginning of a major career: Yaa Gyasi's Homegoing is a novel about race, history, ancestry, love and time, charting the course of two sisters torn apart in 18th century Africa through to the present day. Two half sisters, Effia and Esi, unknown to each other, are born into two different tribal villages in 18th century Ghana. Effia will be married off to an English colonist, and will live in comfort in the sprawling, palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle, raising "half-caste" children who will be sent abroad to be educated in England before returning to the Gold Coast to serve as administrators of the Empire. Her sister, Esi, will be imprisoned beneath Effia in the Castle's women's dungeon, before being shipped off on a boat bound for America, where she will be sold into slavery. Stretching from the tribal wars of Ghana to slavery and Civil War in America, from the coal mines in the north to the Great Migration to the streets of 20th century Harlem, Yaa Gyasi has written a modern masterpiece, a novel that moves through histories and geographies and—with outstanding economy and force—captures the intricacies of the troubled yet hopeful human spirit. From the Hardcover edition.
Homecoming

Homecoming

Author: Cynthia Voigt
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439132070
Pages: 400
Year: 2013-01-15
The iconic start to the timeless, Newbery-winning series from Cynthia Voigt. “It’s still true.” That’s the first thing James Tillerman says to his older sister, Dicey, every morning. It’s still true that their mother has abandoned the four Tillermans in a mall parking lot somewhere in the middle of Connecticut. It’s still true that they have to find their own way to Great-aunt Cilla’s house in Bridgeport. It’s still true that they need to spend as little as possible on food and seek shelter anywhere that is out of view of the authorities. It’s still true that the only way they can hope to all stay together is to just keep moving forward. Deep down, Dicey hopes they can find someone to trust, someone who will take them in and love them. But she’s afraid it’s just too much to hope for....
Lost in the City

Lost in the City

Author: Edward P. Jones
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061748714
Pages: 288
Year: 2009-10-13
“Original and arresting….[Jones’s] stories will touch chords of empathy and recognition in all readers.” —Washington Post “These 14 stories of African-American life…affirm humanity as only good literature can.” —Los Angeles Times A magnificent collection of short fiction focusing on the lives of African-American men and women in Washington, D.C., Lost in the City is the book that first brought author Edward P. Jones to national attention. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and numerous other honors for his novel The Known World, Jones made his literary debut with these powerful tales of ordinary people who live in the shadows in this metropolis of great monuments and rich history. Lost in the City received the Pen/Hemingway Award for Best First Fiction and was a National Book Award Finalist. This beautiful 20th Anniversary Edition features a new introduction by the author, and is a wonderful companion piece to Jones’s masterful novel and his second acclaimed collection of stories, All Aunt Hagar’s Children.
Homegoing

Homegoing

Author: Instaread
Publisher: Instaread Summaries
ISBN: 1683783824
Pages: 37
Year: 2016-06-30
Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi | Summary & Analysis Preview: Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi is a novel in stories about the Atlantic slave trade and its aftermath. The novel begins with the stories of two African half-sisters of the Fante and Asante tribes: Effia and Esi. Effia is born in the late eighteenth century in Fanteland on Africa’s Gold Coast, on the night of a devastating fire near her father’s compound. Her adoptive mother, Baaba, immediately resents her, because Effia is the daughter of her father Cobbe’s house girl. In 1775, when Effia is young, British soldiers from the Cape Coast Castle come to the village. Effia wants to marry Abeeku Badu, who is in line to be chief. But to prevent Effia from marrying him, Baaba tells Effia that she must hide the blood from her first period. She knows that as long as people think Effia is premenstrual, she won’t be permitted to marry a Fante man, per tribal customs… PLEASE NOTE: This is summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book. Inside this Instaread Summary of Homegoing : · Summary of the Book · Important People · Character Analysis · Analysis of the Themes and Author’s Style About the Author With Instaread, you can get the key takeaways, summary and analysis of a book in 15 minutes. We read every chapter, identify the key takeaways and analyze them for your convenience.
Summary of Homegoing

Summary of Homegoing

Author: Instaread Summaries
Publisher: Idreambooks
ISBN: 1683783883
Pages: 28
Year: 2016-07-06

A Mercy

A Mercy

Author: Toni Morrison
Publisher: Vintage Canada
ISBN: 030737307X
Pages: 224
Year: 2009-08-11
A powerful tragedy distilled into a small masterpiece by the Nobel Prize-winning author of Beloved and, almost like a prelude to that story, set two centuries earlier. Jacob is an Anglo-Dutch trader in 1680s United States, when the slave trade is still in its infancy. Reluctantly he takes a small slave girl in part payment from a plantation owner for a bad debt. Feeling rejected by her slave mother, 14-year-old Florens can read and write and might be useful on his farm. Florens looks for love, first from Lina, an older servant woman at her new master's house, but later from the handsome blacksmith, an African, never enslaved, who comes riding into their lives . . . At the novel's heart, like Beloved, it is the ambivalent, disturbing story of a mother and a daughter – a mother who casts off her daughter in order to save her, and a daughter who may never exorcise that abandonment.
Help Me to Find My People

Help Me to Find My People

Author: Heather Andrea Williams
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807882658
Pages: 264
Year: 2012-06-01
After the Civil War, African Americans placed poignant "information wanted" advertisements in newspapers, searching for missing family members. Inspired by the power of these ads, Heather Andrea Williams uses slave narratives, letters, interviews, public records, and diaries to guide readers back to devastating moments of family separation during slavery when people were sold away from parents, siblings, spouses, and children. Williams explores the heartbreaking stories of separation and the long, usually unsuccessful journeys toward reunification. Examining the interior lives of the enslaved and freedpeople as they tried to come to terms with great loss, Williams grounds their grief, fear, anger, longing, frustration, and hope in the history of American slavery and the domestic slave trade. Williams follows those who were separated, chronicles their searches, and documents the rare experience of reunion. She also explores the sympathy, indifference, hostility, or empathy expressed by whites about sundered black families. Williams shows how searches for family members in the post-Civil War era continue to reverberate in African American culture in the ongoing search for family history and connection across generations.
Homegoing

Homegoing

Author: Frederik Pohl
Publisher: P D
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 2010-01-21

Flesh and Bone and Water

Flesh and Bone and Water

Author: Luiza Sauma
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501158023
Pages: 272
Year: 2017-06-20
"Originally published in Great Britain in 2017 by Viking."
The Homegoing

The Homegoing

Author: Michael Olin Hitt
Publisher:
ISBN: 1933964588
Pages: 175
Year: 2012
Fiction. In Laurelville, Ohio—a small town in the foothills of the Appalachians—nobody knows why Hannah Marshal drowned in Laurel Creek in 1937. Over two decades later, her niece, Ruth Sherman, takes it upon herself to find out. As she ispressed by her grandmother to learn the folk cures and healing rituals of Appalachian Christianity and armed with only a few rumors, old newspapers clipping and even some ghost stories about her aunt, Ruth begins to uncover the events surrounding Hannah's death. Twenty-one year old Ruth finds herself on a journey into the past, the traditions of a southern-Ohio Pentecostal church, and the shadowy side of the Holy Ghost among serpent handlers. On the journey, Ruth discovers her own spiritual gifts and uncovers the unspoken shame in her family. "Healings. Snake handlers. Stills. Quotes from the Bible. Family feuds. Chicken coops. Speaking in tongues. Indian medicine bags. Laying outs. Intergenerational rivalry. Forty lashes of hot wax. Old-fashioned tent revivals. Michael Olin-Hitt, in THE HOMEGOING, has, with skillful writing and a true knowledge of home, combined the aura of the mid-twentieth-century Appalachia of southern Ohio with the puzzle of a mysterious disappearance and the solving of a family mystery. Read and enjoy."—Jane Piirto, author of SAUNAS
Redeployment

Redeployment

Author: Phil Klay
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143126822
Pages: 304
Year: 2015
"Taking readers to the front lines of the war in Iraq and back, Redeployment asks us to understand what happened there, and what happened to the soldiers who returned"--Back cover.
For All of Us, One Today

For All of Us, One Today

Author: Richard Blanco
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807033812
Pages: 120
Year: 2013-11-19
2014 International Latino Awards Winner: Best Biography – Spanish or Bilingual For All of Us, One Today is a fluid, poetic story anchored by Richard Blanco’s experiences as the inaugural poet in 2013, and beyond. In this brief and evocative narrative, he shares for the first time his journey as a Latino immigrant and openly gay man discovering a new, emotional understanding of what it means to be an American. He tells the story of the call from the White House committee and all the exhilaration and upheaval of the days that followed. He reveals the inspiration and challenges behind the creation of the inaugural poem, “One Today,” as well as two other poems commissioned for the occasion (“Mother Country” and “What We Know of Country”), published here for the first time ever, alongside translations of all three of those poems into his native Spanish. Finally, Blanco reflects on his life-changing role as a public voice since the inauguration, his spiritual embrace of Americans everywhere, and his vision for poetry’s new role in our nation’s consciousness. Like the inaugural poem itself, For All of Us, One Today speaks to what makes this country and its people great, marking a historic moment of hope and promise in our evolving American landscape. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Facts and Fears

Facts and Fears

Author: James R. Clapper, Trey Brown
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0525558659
Pages: 432
Year: 2018-05-22
New York Times bestseller The former Director of National Intelligence's candid and compelling account of the intelligence community's successes--and failures--in facing some of the greatest threats to America When he stepped down in January 2017 as the fourth United States director of national intelligence, James Clapper had been President Obama's senior intelligence adviser for six and a half years, longer than his three predecessors combined. He led the U.S. intelligence community through a period that included the raid on Osama bin Laden, the Benghazi attack, the leaks of Edward Snowden, and Russia's influence operation during the 2016 U.S. election campaign. In Facts and Fears, Clapper traces his career through the growing threat of cyberattacks, his relationships with presidents and Congress, and the truth about Russia's role in the presidential election. He describes, in the wake of Snowden and WikiLeaks, his efforts to make intelligence more transparent and to push back against the suspicion that Americans' private lives are subject to surveillance. Finally, it was living through Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and seeing how the foundations of American democracy were--and continue to be--undermined by a foreign power that led him to break with his instincts honed through more than five decades in the intelligence profession to share his inside experience. Clapper considers such controversial questions as, Is intelligence ethical? Is it moral to intercept communications or to photograph closed societies from orbit? What are the limits of what we should be allowed to do? What protections should we give to the private citizens of the world, not to mention our fellow Americans? Are there times when intelligence officers can lose credibility as unbiased reporters of hard truths by inserting themselves into policy decisions? Facts and Fears offers a privileged look inside the U.S. intelligence community and, with the frankness and professionalism for which James Clapper is known, addresses some of the most difficult challenges in our nation's history.