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The Value of Homelessness

The Value of Homelessness

Author: Craig Willse
Publisher:
ISBN: 0816693471
Pages: 240
Year: 2015-09-15
It is all too easy to assume that social service programs respond to homelessness, seeking to prevent and understand it. The Value of Homelessness, however, argues that homelessness today is an effect of social services and sciences, which shape not only what counts as such but what will?or ultimately won't?be done about it. Through a history of U.S. housing insecurity from the 1930s to the present, Craig Willse traces the emergence and consolidation of a homeless services industry. How to most efficiently allocate resources to control ongoing insecurity has become the goal, he shows, rather than how to eradicate the social, economic, and political bases of housing needs. Drawing on his own years of work in homeless advocacy and activist settings, as well as interviews conducted with program managers, counselors, and staff at homeless services organizations in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle, Willse provides the first analysis of how housing insecurity becomes organized as a governable social problem. An unprecedented and powerful historical account of the development of contemporary ideas about homelessness and how to manage homelessness, The Value of Homelessness offers new ways for students and scholars of social work, urban inequality, racial capitalism, and political theory to comprehend the central role of homelessness in governance and economy today.
Reckoning with Homelessness

Reckoning with Homelessness

Author: Kim Hopper
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801471605
Pages: 282
Year: 2014-06-13
"It must be some kind of experiment or something, to see how long people can live without food, without shelter, without security."—Homeless woman in Grand Central Station Kim Hopper has dedicated his career to trying to address the problem of homelessness in the United States. In this powerful book, he draws upon his dual strengths as anthropologist and advocate to provide a deeper understanding of the roots of homelessness. He also investigates the complex attitudes brought to bear on the issue since his pioneering fieldwork with Ellen Baxter twenty years ago helped put homelessness on the public agenda. Beginning with his own introduction to the problem in New York, Hopper uses ethnography, literature, history, and activism to place homelessness into historical context and to trace the process by which homelessness came to be recognized as an issue. He tells the largely neglected story of homelessness among African Americans and vividly portrays various sites of public homelessness, such as airports. His accounts of life on the streets make for powerful reading.
Down and Out in America

Down and Out in America

Author: Peter H. Rossi
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022616232X
Pages: 255
Year: 2013-11-22
The most accurate and comprehensive picture of homelessness to date, this study offers a powerful explanation of its causes, proposes short- and long-term solutions, and documents the striking contrasts between the homeless of the 1950s and 1960s and the contemporary homeless population, which is younger and contains more women, children, and blacks.
Unsettling the City

Unsettling the City

Author: Nicholas Blomley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135954186
Pages: 256
Year: 2004-06-01
Short and accessible, this book interweaves a discussion of the geography of property in one global city, Vancouver, with a more general analysis of property, politics, and the city.
A Dream Foreclosed

A Dream Foreclosed

Author: Laura Gottesdiener
Publisher: Zuccotti Park Press
ISBN: 1884519210
Pages: 185
Year: 2013
"Real-life stories of how banks are ravaging the country--particularly African American communities--and how some families have joined together to fight back. The ongoing economic crisis has created one of the longest and largest mass displacements in U.S. history. While profiting from government bailouts, banks have evicted more than ten million Americans from their homes, destroying their life savings, their economic security and their dreams. Told through the eyes of four families, A Dream Foreclosed reveals the ongoing human tragedy of the crisis--and the spectacular possibilities that emerge when everyday people challenge the all-powerful corporations that the U.S. government considers 'too big to indict.'"--Cover p. [4].
Lost in Space

Lost in Space

Author: Randall Amster
Publisher: Lfb Scholarly Pub Llc
ISBN:
Pages: 269
Year: 2008-01-01
Amster explores the historical and contemporary implications of homelessness as a social and spatial problem, drawing upon academic disciplines and policy concerns ranging from urban geography to legal advocacy. Homeless people find themselves in a struggle to preserve places that are theoretically open to everyone regardless of status. Urban spaces in particular manifest a complex ecology comprised of people, culture, architecture, technology, and the natural environment, expressed through gentrification, redevelopment, and privatization. In this ecology, homeless people are criminalized for performing basic activities such as sitting or sleeping. These trends are evident across the U.S. and internationally, linking local issues with wider forces of globalization.
At Home on the Street

At Home on the Street

Author: Jason Adam Wasserman, Jeffrey M. Clair
Publisher: Lynne Rienner Pub
ISBN:
Pages: 252
Year: 2010
"In their examination of what it means to be truly at home on the street, Jason Wasserman and Jeffrey Clair argue that programs and policies addressing homeless people too often serve only to alienate them. They delve into the complex realities of homelessness to paint a gripping picture of individuals - not cases or pathologies - living on the street and of their strategies for daily survival. By exploring the private spaces that those who are homeless create for themselves, as well as their prevailing social mores, the authors explain how well-intentioned policies and programs often only widen the gap between the indigent and mainstream society. The result is an unvarnished look at the culture of long-term homelessness and a fresh approach to reaching this resurgent population." --Book Jacket.
Homelessness in New York City

Homelessness in New York City

Author: Thomas J. Main
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479846872
Pages: 288
Year: 2017-09-12
The story of New York City’s struggle to provide shelter for its homeless population Can American cities respond effectively to pressing social problems? Or, as many scholars have claimed, are urban politics so mired in stasis, gridlock and bureaucratic paralysis that dramatic policy change is impossible? Homelessness in New York City tells the remarkable story of how America’s largest city has struggled for more than thirty years to meet the crisis of modern homelessness through the landmark development, since the initiation of the Callahan v Carey litigation in 1979, of a municipal shelter system based on a court-enforced right to shelter. New York City now shelters more than 50,000 otherwise homeless people at an annual cost of more than $1 billion in the largest and most complex shelter system in the world. Establishing the right to shelter was a dramatic break with long established practice. Developing and managing the shelter system required the city to repeatedly overcome daunting challenges, from dealing with mentally ill street dwellers to confronting community opposition to shelter placement. In the course of these efforts many classic dilemmas in social policy and public administration arose. Does adequate provision for the poor create perverse incentives? Can courts manage recalcitrant bureaucracies? Is poverty rooted in economic structures or personal behavior? The tale of how five mayors—Koch, Dinkins, Giuliani, Bloomberg and de Blasio—have wrestled with these problems is one of caution and hope: the task is difficult and success is never unqualified, but positive change is possible. Homelessness in New York City tells the remarkable story of what happened—for good and sometimes less good—when New York established the right to shelter.
Social Policy and Social Justice

Social Policy and Social Justice

Author: Michael Reisch
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1483320758
Pages: 544
Year: 2013-02-21
Social Policy and Social Justice provides today's students and tomorrow's practitioners with a comprehensive overview of U.S. social policy and the policymaking process. Author and editor Michael Reisch brings together experts in the field to help students understand these policies and prepare them for the emerging realities that will shape practice in the 21st century. This text explores the critical contextual components of social policy—including history, ideology, political-economy, and culture—and demonstrates major substantive areas of policy such as income maintenance and health/mental health.
The Routledge Handbook of Poverty in the United States

The Routledge Handbook of Poverty in the United States

Author: Stephen Haymes, Maria Vidal de Haymes, Reuben Miller
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317627393
Pages: 633
Year: 2014-12-17
In the United States, the causes and even the meanings of poverty are disconnected from the causes and meanings of global poverty. The Routledge Handbook of Poverty in the United States provides an authoritative overview of the relationship of poverty with the rise of neoliberal capitalism in the context of globalization. Reorienting its national economy towards a global logic, US domestic policies have promoted a market-based strategy of economic development and growth as the obvious solution to alleviating poverty, affecting approaches to the problem discursively, politically, economically, culturally and experientially. However, the handbook explores how rather than alleviating poverty, it has instead exacerbated poverty and pre-existing inequalities – privatizing the services of social welfare and educational institutions, transforming the state from a benevolent to a punitive state, and criminalizing poor women, racial and ethnic minorities, and immigrants. Key issues examined by the international selection of leading scholars in this volume include: income distribution, employment, health, hunger, housing and urbanization. With parts focusing on the lived experience of the poor, social justice and human rights frameworks – as opposed to welfare rights models – and the role of helping professions such as social work, health and education, this comprehensive handbook is a vital reference for anyone working with those in poverty, whether directly or at a macro level.
Ending Homelessness

Ending Homelessness

Author: Donald W. Burnes, David L. Dileo
Publisher:
ISBN: 1626375070
Pages: 325
Year: 2016-05-01
The number of people experiencing homelessness has not changed significantly in the past 35 years¿despite billions of dollars spent at the federal, state, and local levels. Why aren¿t we closer to the goal of ending homelessness? In Ending Homelessness: Why We Haven¿t, How We Can, leading scholars and practitioners explore the complicated, and often mismatched, relationship between efforts to address homelessness and the dynamics of this persistent, yet subtly shifting social problem. The authors examine the politics and policies of the past three decades¿wrestling with practical, cultural, and economic questions alike¿to shed light on barriers to and opportunities for addressing a chronic challenge.
Confronting Homelessness

Confronting Homelessness

Author: David Wagner, Jennifer Barton Gilman
Publisher: Lynne Rienner Pub
ISBN: 1588268233
Pages: 207
Year: 2012
Whose fault is homelessness? Thirty years ago the problem exploded as a national crisis, drawing the attention of activists, the media, and policymakers at all levels, yet the homeless population endures to this day, and arguably has grown. In this book the author offers a major reconsideration of homelessness in the U.S., casting a critical eye on how we as a society respond to crises of inequality and stratification. Incorporating local studies into a national narrative, he probes how homelessness shifted from being the subject of a politically charged controversy over poverty and social class to posing a functional question of social service delivery. At the heart of his analysis is insight into why we accept highly symbolic policies that dampen public outrage, but fail to address the fundamental structural problems that would allow real change.
Contending Economic Theories

Contending Economic Theories

Author: Richard D. Wolff, Stephen A. Resnick
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262517833
Pages: 406
Year: 2012-09-07
Rev. ed. of: Economics: Marxian versus neoclassical. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, c1987.
The Space of Boredom

The Space of Boredom

Author: Bruce O'Neill
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822373270
Pages: 280
Year: 2017-03-17
In The Space of Boredom Bruce O'Neill explores how people cast aside by globalism deal with an intractable symptom of downward mobility: an unshakeable and immense boredom. Focusing on Bucharest, Romania, where the 2008 financial crisis compounded the failures of the postsocialist state to deliver on the promises of liberalism, O'Neill shows how the city's homeless are unable to fully participate in a society that is increasingly organized around practices of consumption. Without a job to work, a home to make, or money to spend, the homeless—who include pensioners abandoned by their families and the state—struggle daily with the slow deterioration of their lives. O'Neill moves between homeless shelters and squatter camps, black labor markets and transit stations, detailing the lives of men and women who manage boredom by seeking stimulation, from conversation and coffee to sex in public restrooms or going to the mall or IKEA. Showing how boredom correlates with the downward mobility of Bucharest's homeless, O'Neill theorizes boredom as an enduring affect of globalization in order to provide a foundation from which to rethink the politics of alienation and displacement.
The Death and Life of Great American Cities

The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Author: Jane Jacobs
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 052543285X
Pages: 480
Year: 2016-07-20
Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.